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Jul 06, 2022 8:57 PM
Abrogail Thrune reviews submissions
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This recently written fanfiction tells the slice of life story of Abrogail as a barista at a coffee-shop-but-for-tea. The author seems to have based her character on the reviews Abrogail has written - the fictional Abrogail is depicted as a romantic who enjoys nerding out about science. She gives many of her customers love life advice, often encouraging them to be ambitious and pursue their desires, even when those desires scare them. There are occasional tangents of long excited discussions about science between Abrogail and various customers - covering such topics as the functioning of the research center at the south pole during the winter, whether particle physics is relevant to philosophy, and exactly how a human would die if you threw them into a blackhole. 
 
Every few chapters she seems to fall in love with a different customer, often torturing and fucking them. She quickly grows bored with each crush - a fact that is depicted as tragic. 

The entire fanfiction takes place in the coffee-shop-but-for-tea, including the sex scenes which are treated as entirely normal things to occur in public.

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Firstplanet: Horny version of 2001 opening scene Firstplanet has also heard the rumors about Abrogail's tastes! Something like sixth- or seventh-hand, admittedly, but they still hope this novella will be more of a hit.

On a planet whose human inhabitants have barely become more interesting than other species of ape, a black obelisk appears. It ensnares the mind of any human who comes near and sets them a task. The tasks vary in complexity and duration, but the results of success and failure are always the same: for failure, stabbing pain and an explanation of how to do better, for success, ineffable pleasure and delicious food and a harder task. The humans strive to please their alien god, accomplishing successively greater feats of dexterity and intelligence and clearly becoming a nascent civilization. Of the three viewpoint characters, one fails too often and loses the obelisk's attention entirely; the other two excel with fire and stone tools and twisting string and drawing primitive maps. The descriptions of their devotion to the obelisk and the experience of communing with it are blatantly and unashamedly horny, but none of the sexiness involves body parts in any way. Eventually one of the protagonists invents the first alphabet, and is rewarded with a vision of their descendants walking on the planet's moon, where a second obelisk awaits them. The novella ends shortly thereafter with the two successful protagonists being told to produce offspring with each other.

 

She knows some clerics of Asmodeus who will get off on this, but it's not suitable for enlightening the general populace, particularly.

She's looking for romance novels at a somewhat more magi-technologically advanced level than this, please?  For people who're still searching for a cheap way to manufacture alkali for use in paper-making, for example.

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More books arrive! Paperbacks. Whoever printed and bound them puts little value on the aesthetics of outer appearances; the covers are off-white like the pages inside them.

The first book is an aggressively mundane (though comically written) tale about subsistence farmers in a fantasy setting with technology on par with Golarion's. The male and female leads keep their heads down through political turmoil and dragon-slayings; the drama in the story mainly comes from the psychological distress inflicted on their entire extended family from having to hurry to get the planting done in time. One gets the impression in reading it that the setting is based on a well-known legend typically told from a different vantage point, but knowing the exact details there isn't really necessary to enjoy it (if you're the sort of person who enjoys the sort of thing).

The second book centers on a LG teenage boy who vanishes from their industrialized society (mentioned in tantalizing passing) and finds themself falling out of the sky in a much more primitive one--by far less technologically advanced than Golarion--as a burly man with 20s in all their physical stats. Injured from the fall, he's nursed to health by a society of CE raiders tell him that he's their prophesied hero who'll elevate them beyond their humble means. At first horrified by their slavery and brutality, the book goes into great detail about how being lovebombed and worshiped corrupts him to Evil. (And into detail about how a messiah-figure obsessed with discipline and drill turns disorganized and factional raiders into a more Lawful fighting force, all without invoking the terminology of Alignment at all). He takes on a harem to share his phenomenal stats with future generations, and unites various clans and conquers small polities over twenty years while preparing in earnest for world conquest. He . . . helps them industrialize somewhat beyond the point of Golarion! The book goes into detail on the science of gunpowder, steam engines, and telegraphs! After years of war, his armies clash against a great walled city that'd been set up as a threat since the start of the book. They're led by a genius inventor and strategist themself, a woman who he becomes obsessed with. After finally breaching the city and enslaving the populace, he takes her for his harem--determined to make her his.

The book then abruptly shifts perspectives, starting again where the main character falls from the sky, but this time as a young girl and in a different place. She wins the respect of the walled city with her technical and philosophical knowledge, and becomes beloved by them--showing them a more egalitarian way. When the raiders become an increasingly salient threat, and diplomacy fails, she helps them prepare to defend the city, but it isn't enough. She considers resolving to kill herself if she's captured, but can't bring herself to do so, instead resolving to try her best to do what good she can while looking for a path to escape and survive. But when she's taken as a slave, she realizes that her captor is an alternate version of herself. The rest of the book shifts perspectives frequently as the male lead struggles with resurgent guilt and despair--brought to earth, his power fantasy interrupted--and details how he attacks the female lead in anger. Meanwhile the female lead tries to lead him towards the light, all the time trying to keep the flames of hope alive in her own heart and doing what she can to help the other harem girls. Eventually, though, they both give into despair and live a miserable codependent life on each other; ruling the world empire joylessly without the resolve to steer events in any particular way until it ossifies and tears itself apart.

Abandoning family and other obligations, they turn to subsistence farming and slowly they find some small measure of peace.

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Fayliens: Coffeeshop Abrogail

This recently written fanfiction tells the slice of life story of Abrogail as a barista at a coffee-shop-but-for-tea. The author seems to have based her character on the reviews Abrogail has written - the fictional Abrogail is depicted as a romantic who enjoys nerding out about science. She gives many of her customers love life advice, often encouraging them to be ambitious and pursue their desires, even when those desires scare them. There are occasional tangents of long excited discussions about science between Abrogail and various customers - covering such topics as the functioning of the research center at the south pole during the winter, whether particle physics is relevant to philosophy, and exactly how a human would die if you threw them into a blackhole.

Every few chapters she seems to fall in love with a different customer, often torturing and fucking them. She quickly grows bored with each crush - a fact that is depicted as tragic.

The entire fanfiction takes place in the coffee shop, including the sex scenes which are treated as entirely normal things to occur in public.

 

...

 

 

Abrogail has literally no idea how to react to this.

She'll... have the name changed by somebody disposable and then ship it off to the wizards, she guesses.

She'll write back to the Fayliens that she enjoyed the technical parts but all the purported sex and romance here is just way way way too - Abrogail doesn't even have words - too consensual.

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@The Refuge's first book is not worth mentioning; the second book...

 

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Aspexia, how do we handle this?  We can't just keep the book a secret and not reprint it, while using the knowledge within it, if we want more books like it - correct?  But if we print it widely enough to be read, we gain no advantage thereby.

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Use the knowledge within the book, kept at first secret; and then, having conquered the world thereby, translate it and print it for all to read - we shall so commit ourselves.  Unless some still more valuable and more Asmodean book is received in the interim, to obsolete this book's technical contribution.

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Makes sense!

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And review it, Abrogail.

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Her verdict is obvious:  It's 200% of a good book, in the sense that the first half of the book would constitute a good book.

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Here's some porn about a woman with the inexplicable ability to transform other people's bodies, who really likes a very specific type (women who are entirely human save having large fluffy fox/dog/wolf/cat-ears and fluffy tails and playful demeanors, and can be trained into being masochists) who uses this power to solve many of her interpersonal problems and make people her overly sensitive pain-and-pleasure-drunk foxgirl slaves. Eventually a man with magic-reflecting magic that she would have known about had she bothered to check turns the tables on her and she experiences her own descent into the pleasant haze of obedience. Its appendices include speculative foxgirl biology and some nerding out about nutritional science and a detailed rant about runaway sexual selection in evolution.

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On the stack to print in a few more years or decades after Cheliax finishes conquering the world!  It's a pity they can't reprint it sooner; this would make a tasty bit of meaninglessly fluffy candy for a young girl.  Actually, how about if they strip out the appendices and print it now, in limited circulation, with appendices and worldwide circulation to come after Hell conquers all?

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Try for a little more detail here, Abrogail.

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...allll right then:  This is a book for young girls, not a book for young women, because the protagonist solves her problems with sorcery and not with cruelty, ambition, cleverness, wisdom.  Which is the protagonist's downfall in the end, as is proper; but it also makes the book, as Abrogail stated, meaningless fluff.

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The Refuge book senders would like more details on what she liked and disliked about the second book, so they can scour bookstores for ones that she might like! Also does she mind if they "post" her comments on the "web" forum, to solicit people's recommendations?

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Yep, that's pretty fair! It's not very deep, it's not meant to be. It's porn. She's glad Abrogail likes it though, more people should see the beauty of foxgirls.

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@The Refuge:

It's the difference between reading about future devils and reading about future paving stones - whether people's flaws are in the end corrected by the suffering they endure, or if it simply destroys them.  The first book-half is about a man aspiring to greatness and conquest, whom healthy Chelish girls might justly desire as a superior to seduce and exploit.  The second book-half is a story of people who could have been great, but whose flaws - their need for love, their need to love, their dissatisfaction with a life that contains only power - in the end prevent them from achieving that greatness.  It's realistic, don't get her wrong, but it's not fun to read.  

Abrogail has turned any number of people into probable future paving stones, to be clear, and enjoyed the process.  But she wouldn't continue to enjoy reading their stories from the victim's perspective after they'd broken.  People who shatter completely stop being interesting to her.  She sometimes keeps them around in the dungeon for a few years, worked on by other employees of hers, so she can come back and enjoy how broken they still are.  But that's - how can Abrogail put this?  That's a passing moment of pleasure in her story.  Not their story.  They don't have stories anymore once Abrogail is through with them.  It's not about their horror and anguish and suffering, past that point, it's about herself being so powerful and rich that she can afford to have that done to people on a whim.  That she can make herself be the center of somebody else's universe, make it so their universe contains nothing else but her own Will and the endless horror it inflicts on them, and then that Will just ignores them from then on except to occasionally look in on and enjoy the meaninglessness of a meaninglessly suffering empty thing.

The second book-half is a novel of literary self-destruction, as the novel's characters become less and less deserving of having a story.

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A copy of the Asmodean Disciplines has found its way to the sonataverse, where it acquired a small but enthusiastic fandom. With a combination of spotty reading comprehension and no actual clerics, the fandom has invented or reinvented as many as several heresies.

It's somewhat unclear whether this untitled book is fiction or nonfiction; it might be a collection of loosely-connected short stories, or possibly a collection of case studies, or possibly some of each.

[torture, rape, suicide]¹

There are several straightforward cases of a slave failing in some task and being graphically tortured for it in various ways; the narration generally gives the impression that torture is sensual and intimate. When orders are given, they are often given by being inscribed in the slave's skin. At no point is any actual coercion, or its absence, mentioned; there is no indication of what, if anything, would happen if a "slave" were to try to run away.

Against this backdrop, highlights include:

  • A slave who has done nothing in particular wrong is graphically tortured because the master feels like it.

  • A slave fails in a task, begs to be punished for it, and is cruelly denied, leaving them to stew in their unalleviated feelings of guilt.

  • A slave succeeds in a task, but the master feels that the slave is too proud of their success, bordering on uppity; graphic torture ensues.

  • A free person develops a crush on the master and writes them a breathless horny plea to make them suffer. The master offers them a contract, and when they sign, orders them caned and doesn't stay to watch. The scene where the caning is carried out is written as detached, impersonal, and boring. The slave who performed the caning is subsequently rewarded by being raped, for which they are sincerely grateful.

  • A slave is jealous of another slave receiving more attention from the master, and plans to murder-suicide them. However, after killing the rival but before killing themself, they decide that it's not their place as a slave to decide their own punishment, and confesses to the master. The master banishes them, leaving them with the sole order to "suffer". The exile retires to a hut in the woods, where they experiment with rubbing various herbs into cuts to discover which ones cause the most unpleasantness with the least risk of permanent loss of sensitivity, carefully recording their findings and breeding more potent strains of the most promising candidates. (Their findings are detailed in the text.) After receiving a bee-sting while working in the garden, they branch out into stings and bites from venomous insects. Eventually, they try the wrong species of spider, and die wracked equally by pain and by the guilt of having failed to prolong their penance further.

The volume is bound in human skin; a note at the end claims that the donor was still alive at the time that the book was sent.

 

¹ [No content warnings are present in-universe.]

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. . . it suddenly occurs to us to ask, uh, who it is we're sending books to and why?

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@Sonataverse:  Great masterpieces these stories are not... is what she'd like to say, but most adorable fluffy Asmodean porn is, frankly, a lot worse-written than this.  This book should be widely printed in Chelish erotica stores and displace the more poorly-written erotica there.  Sure, an explicit theme of fear-based obedience rather than simple obedience might be nice, but -

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Aspexia likes simple obedience.  There's nothing wrong with simple obedience.

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...of course you would think that.

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Yes, of course she would.  These stories are fine the way they are, and should be printed unaltered.

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. . . it suddenly occurs to us to ask, uh, who it is we're sending books to and why?

@The Refuge:

Abrogail Thrune is a rich woman who pays other people to write romance novels for her - she's been doing that since she was sixteen and inherited the family fortune - and yes, she supposes she has some personal habits that Lawful Good fuddy-duddies might find unpleasant.

She's passing on all the technological innovations in the books directly to the government of her home country of Cheliax, though, which has plans to use the knowledge to increase the wealth of everyone in Cheliax, and, in time, her planet as a whole will be wealthier too.  There's plans to print The Refuge's previous books throughout her planet, distributing the knowledge there worldwide, as soon as things can be set up so that this doesn't prolong any current or immediate-future wars.

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Wow, that implies such fascinating things about how your world's society structured itself.

The forum we posted in recommended this romance about researchers with a highly infectious novel virus quarantining together trying to find a cure before it kills them and they're vitrified, as a romance novel that has good medical science in it. We tried sending a textbook, but it didn't work.

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She'll pass on this otherwise empty and meaningless romance novel to her government!  Their efforts at finding books like these will have a great impact on Golarion!

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