Nov 21, 2019 2:23 PM
Next Post »
« Previous Post
Permalink

How do people keep track of time? And for other Earth-based civilizations, what year is it?

For me it's August, 2024 Common Era (CE, or equivalently AD for Anno Domini). I got back to Earth in 2009 and the Hunters attacked us November of 2014. San Diego was destroyed in January 2019.

We customarily start our years in January, which begins slightly after the winter solstice; there are 12 months, January February March April May June July August September October November December, which have about 30 days each for a total of 365 per year, with extra days added slightly less than every 4th year to account for our orbit being 365 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes, and 12 seconds long (on average). 

1 day = 24 hours, 1 hour = 60 minutes, 1 minute = 60 seconds. For humans, 1 second is about one heartbeat long; technically it's defined in terms of a specific radioactive decay but that's only used for scientific purposes.

Some people, mostly nerds in space, have started counting dates as AV for After the Vancouver attack; it's 10 AV now. 1 AV starts on the first of January 2015.

Total: 16
Posts Per Page:
Permalink

That more or less matches what we use on the Mugunghwa. It's year 2832 A.D. by Earth's reconing, or 408 A.L. for us. Marked after the start of engine warmup for the initial launch of the generation ship. We've done away with leap days and haven't designed a calendar based on our destinations orbit yet.

Permalink

I'm from an Earth-alike, and our dating system matches yours; the current year is 2008 (AD/CE).

I know of three other such worlds in which the date is the same; one in which it is 1945; and one in which it is 2167 (all AD/CE).

Permalink

It's 2101 for us on the legacy calendar.

Permalink

You do not know *special things*. Here is some. *Time* is not one but many. *Slow time* is best. *Fast time*, is too much *frumple*! I make and find *bright* *smooth* *colours*, in even more *pleasant combinations*; then *slide* *in between* to *inside*. Never leave!

Permalink

You're not being translated very clearly. Some of the things you've said in other posts suggest you don't have a linear relationship with time. Is that true?

Permalink

*Spitting* is difficult. *Squirting* nice *colors* is the best *game*!

This *house* is too *hard* for *parties*. We could *paint* it, but not *dance* with Mother Starlight. Too *silly*! It is okay.

*Levels* are so many! My *fingers* *touch* many *levels*. Some *levels* are *round* and *lumpy* in *fast time*. So bad!!

Permalink

Orz's concepts are coming through a little more clearly to me. A little.

Orz does not really think like humans and seems to exist in multiple places. That's about all I can tell so far.

Permalink

It is the 146th year since our community was built. Our years start with Sez Nitan and end with Sez Shevoth, but most people just use the number of the month. The year starts at the end of the windy season, and is 32 months long. If our years are an imperfect number of days, we haven't noticed the difference.

1 year = 32 months, 1 month = 4 weeks, 1 week = 8 days, 1 day = 2 swaps = 32 waits, 1 wait = 64 pauses, 1 pause = 16 breaths. A breath is about long enough for six heartbeats.

Permalink

I do not know of a calendar as you describe, but it is possible some of the larger villages have such systems. Most of the woods are in Autumn, most of the time, but some areas occasionally have Spring, Summer, or Winter. Different regions move through seasons at different speeds, and in different orders. It is possible to stay quite a while in one section of the woods, only to leave and discover that only a few days have passed nearby.

Permalink
  • 2172 AD/CE ("Anno Domini"/"Common Era", in the Gregorian calendar system, which is falling out of use somewhat due to people on Earth having trouble with pure solar calendars and people in space wanting to distance themselves from Earth somewhat.)
  • 6.38e9 POSIX time (number of seconds since 1 January 1970 AD/CE)
  • I50 YMR ("Year of Martian rain", a relatively common Earth-synced solar calendar. It turns out there's not actually all that much demand for Earth-synced solar calendars these days, probably due to reduced terrestrial timekeeping abilities, but YMR is the calendar used by people who need to use an Earth solar calendar but are highly antitheistic, which is, given the circumstances, a somewhat large group.)
  • 5932 AM ("Anno Mundi", in the Hebrew lunisolar calendar, which is becoming more commonly used on Earth, due to it being easier to personally check where you are in a lunisolar calendar than in a pure solar calendar.)

The same lunar calendar rules are used with a wide range of start dates, making years a bit inconsistent, because once you stop using a common standard, it turns out everyone really likes having their calendar start around when something they like was founded, and naming months after things they like. There is, however, a good consensus on how many lunar months (64) it's been since the shutdown.

Permalink

I'm super jealous of all of you with reliable calendars. Here it's more like the Arborist says - timekeeping is local. Different islands count different numbers of days. They count months based on the growth cycles of local plants. Then historians gather up documents from across the sky to try to figure out what happened before what else and assign historical years to events.

Permalink

Eskay, do you not have a moon? Even if you don't reliably have cloudless nights on new moons, some places should have them some of the time, and the difference between one and two lunar months is pretty noticeable. Earth manages to maintain relatively good calendars, just not solar ones, unless they have good equipment or are unusually diligent.

Then again, Earth's intermittent contact with New Pripyat and the airships and the mountaineering computing clubs and yours truly certainly doesn't hurt. And the local astrologers have better incentives than yours, if you have any. Still, I would like to think I could help.

Permalink

I think humans use the same one as most of yours, we're 2013 CE.

Monsters count shorter days, and I think shorter years, 2179. Sometimes they put X in the ones part of some years? Counting by when some crystals glow for days or weeks, I think years starting from when they were underground.

Permalink

iunom, some places do have moons some of the time, but I haven't heard of them keeping predictable schedules.

Permalink

Eskay, that sounds extremely frustrating and I'm sorry to hear that.

Permalink

Since I am currently living on an asteroid in the Furthest Ring, outside of linear time, there is a sense in which calendars do not meaningfully apply to me for the time being. However, in my personal timeline it has been only a few Earth days since I fled the destruction of humanity, which occurred on the Thirteenth of April, 2009 AD.

This Thread Is On Hiatus
Total: 16
Posts Per Page: